Pirates of the cyber Caribbean holding Disney movie for ransom

Just two days after the worldwide WannaCry ransomware hack swept across the world, wreaking havoc to banks, medical facilities, and corporate entities, a new ransom attack has emerged which puts one of Disney’s billion dollar movie franchise on the edge.

On May 16 it was reported that an unknown hacker, or group of hackers, have stolen a digital copy of Disney’s upcoming Pirates of the Caribbean movie, and are demanding a large ransom payment to keep it from being distributed for free across the net.

Just days after Netflix saw its “Orange Is The New Black” show leaked by a ransom-hacker, and amid the largest global ransomware attack in history, Deadline reports that Disney’s upcoming Johnny Depp film ‘Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales’ has been pilfered by ransom hackers seeking payment from the studio.

According to Deadline.com, the hackers have demanded an enormous amount of money be paid to Bitcoin. Disney is currently working with the FBI and will not pay. Although Disney CEO Bob Iger did not reveal which movie the ransom hackers claim to have, he did reveal to ABC employees during a town hall meeting in New York on Monday that the incident had occurred. The hackers said they would release bits of the film — in increments — if their demands weren’t met. Deadline learned that it was, indeed, Jerry Bruckheimer’s fifth in the Pirates franchise, which is scheduled for release May 26. Disney would not comment, but insiders said that the company refuse to pay. This follows the same issue Netflix faced when a ransom hacker spilled out 10 episodes of the next season of Orange Is The New Black when Netflix also refused to ante up. – Zerohedge

Cyber hacking is quickly becoming the most pronounced form of crime and terrorism, as we have already had malware intrusions affect hundreds of thousands of systems worldwide, and hacks that have facilitated the theft of nearly $100 million from the world’s central banks.

Image result for cyber attack ransom hollywood

Ironically most Hollywood movies today are already uploaded to the internet within a day or week after they come out, due primarily to the indifference to intellectual property rights engendered by foreign countries when these movies are shown in their theaters.  And it appears also that cyber crime is not just limited to attacks on government or military targets, but a whole myriad of systems from Mom and Pop’s pc, to now billion dollar multi-national corporations.

Kenneth Schortgen Jr is a writer for The Daily Economist, Secretsofthefed.comRoguemoney.net, and Viral Liberty, and hosts the popular youtube podcast on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Ken can also be heard Wednesday afternoons giving an weekly economic report on the Angel Clark radio show.